Spring 2020 Events

Please write to Eliza Bettinger (ecb4) with questions.

TALK

Data Overload: Managing Qualitative Data in the Humanities and Beyond
Mon. Feb. 3, 4:30-5:30pm

Kelsey Utne, History PhD Candidate & Digital CoLab Assistant

Do you spend time in the archive and then come home drowning in material you struggle to keep track of? While the digital revolution has exponentially increased the volume of information scholars examine in the course of research, our methods for managing that information haven't kept pace. We're all drowning in urls, archival photos, and online database results. By automating the boring stuff (as Al Sweigart says), researchers are able to focus on their analysis and writing. This talk will focus on a few of the ways that digital humanities skillsets can allow researchers to be more efficient and thorough in their documentation and data collection. 

WORKSHOP

Digital Privacy & Anonymity Basics for Students & Academic Researchers
Thurs Feb. 6, 4-5:30pm

Eliza Bettinger, Lead Librarian for Digital Scholarship

Privacy -- the freedom to think, read, write, and correspond without fear of observation -- is fundamental to intellectual freedom. Yet, the same digital technologies that make possible contemporary research, correspondence, and publication have also brought us the potential for round-the-clock surveillance of our daily activities by corporations, states, and trolls. What are some of the digital privacy risks we face while working and traveling? How might you mitigate these risks? This workshop serves as an informal, conversational introduction to the digital privacy landscape, and includes information on resources at Cornell for getting help with specialized concerns.

WORKSHOP 

Introduction to Computational Text Analysis
Wednes Feb 12, 4:30-5:30pm

Malcolm Bare, PhD Candidate in English & Digital CoLab Assistant

What kinds of scholarly questions can humanists and social scientists ask with text mining? This hands-on session will cover different methods and approaches for computational text analysis. We will focus largely on count-based methods including topic modelling, word similarity, authorship, and sentiment analysis. No experience in coding is needed.

SPECIAL EVENT

Douglass Day Transcribe-a-thon
Friday Feb. 14, 3-5pm

You're invited to a birthday party for Frederick Douglass. Although Douglass was born into bondage, and never knew his birthdate, he celebrated every year on February 14th.
Along with thousands of others around the country, we celebrate this day as a moment for preserving Black history together.
Join us this year to help transcribe, read, and teach the papers of Anna Julia Cooper, a visionary Black feminist. Her work influenced generations, yet today she is underappreciated. Transcriptions of historical documents like these make them available for digital searching, analysis, and future research. Let's share her writings & legacy with future generations!
No experience needed! Drop in at the Digital CoLab, choose a letter or diary entry of Anna Julia Cooper’s to transcribe, and enjoy some music, snacks, and birthday cake.

WORKSHOP

Introduction to SQLite Databases for Humanities Research
Monday Feb. 17, 4:30-5:30pm

Kelsey Utne, Ph.D. Candidate in History & Digital CoLab Assistant

At this introductory workshop, participants will learn about using databases to manage research in the humanities and social sciences. We will discuss what a relational database is, when you might want to create one, and how to get started. Participants will get hands-on experience working with a sample dataset. If you’ve attended Kelsey’s talk on Feb. 3 and want some practical guidance in applying her methods to your own work, this is a great place to do it!

TALK

Second Homes: Using Natural Language Processing Techniques to Find Paradomestic Architectures in the Novel
Wednesday Feb 26, 4:30 – 5:30pm

Malcolm Bare, Ph.D. Candidate in English & Digital CoLab Assistant

How do literature scholars apply computational text analysis in their research? In this talk for a general audience, Malcolm Bare will describe his work combining close-reading and computer-assisted distant-reading techniques to investigate Elizabeth Gaskell’s industrial fiction. Specifically, he asks how the nineteenth-century novel imagines shelters outside the architecture of the home, and looks at how Natural Language Processing techniques can be used with standard descriptions of homes to uncover home-like spaces. 

WORKSHOP

Using QGIS to Map Census & Voting Data
Tuesday March 3, 4:30-5:30

Eliza Bettinger, Lead Librarian for Digital Scholarship

One of the most popular ways for historians and social scientists to make use of GIS software is to map historical U.S. Census data. This workshop will teach participants how to locate US Census data from 1790 to the present, and how to map and analyze it with QGIS, a free and open source GIS package. We’ll also look at where to find election results data for GIS analysis, and how to combine that with Census data on eligible voters.
Please bring your laptop or borrow one from the Olin Library Circulation Desk. In advance, please download and install QGIS on the machine. For troubleshooting installation on a Mac, see the instructions on this video.

SPECIAL EVENT

Privacy Party for Students & Scholars
Friday April 10, 3-5pm

Bring your laptop and mobile devices and get hands-on with tools for digital privacy and anonymity. Heard of apps like password managers, Tor browser, Signal, or others? Curious about the practicalities of how to install and use these tools? Confused about when or why you might want to? A privacy party is a low-key, informal, and hopefully fun place to ask questions, get help, and take some practical steps to improve your privacy, security, and anonymity online